Jul 29

5 Ways to Make Your Wardrobe Last Forever

by The Seam

You know *that* pile? The one sitting at the back of your wardrobe (or potentially on an un-sittable, piled-to-the-brim bedroom chair)? The one filled with clothes that aren’t quite ready to rewear, whether it’s a bad stain, victim to a moth attack, or just delicate enough that you aren’t quite sure how to wash it.

At The Seam, we’re committed to making clothes fit well, and making them last. We’ve put together our top tips for taking care of your wardrobe, from washing well to storing correctly and repairing things before they become unfixable.

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Every garment comes with a care label, usually found on the inside seam, which offers some key information, including 1) how to launder the item and 2) what it’s made from. The laundry info usually features a temperature indication (such as 30°, 40°, or warmer). It’s important to know that these temperatures refer to the hottest wash your garment can endure, rather than what it should be washed at. In most cases, wash cooler, at 30°. This is less invasive on garments and helps them last longer.

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Stains happen, and the faster you act is usually the better. It’s important to know the type of stain you’re working with before treating, so you can apply the most effective solution, or even pass on this info to a professional cleaner for the best chance of removal. Find our guide to removing common stains here.

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When your knitted jumpers and woollen treasures fall victim to a moth hole or a bad snag, getting them fixed sooner rather than later is key. Knitwear’s structure means that a hole or tear in any kind of knitted garment, (socks, jumpers, undies, jersey, etc) left unchecked, can increase in size until it unravels the entire piece. We suggest inspecting often, and repairing immediately. We can help you with the latter part.

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Leather goods can be preserved for years by keeping them away from sunlight and moisture. We recommend storing bags and shoes in a dry, clean wardrobe, inside of a dustbag. Adding a silica gel packet into the dust bag is an additional way to keep out moisture.

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You know that dopamine feeling of buying something new? What if we could replace the element of consumption in that transaction with the practice of care? That can mean having your favourite (no longer white-soled) sneakers professionally cleaned to a spotless state, or having a favourite pair of jeans reinforced at the seams when they start to abrase. Whatever the project, investing in what we already own instead of seeking out more newness is a step in the right direction for our planet.

That’s all from us & The Seam today, if you have any specific questions, or want to get advice from a specialist you can slide in our DMs (and we’ll swiftly refer you to The Seam’s DMs because we’re in the same oblivion boat as you).

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